Short Statements on artistic knowledge production

Media: performance-based installation (silverpoint, holes, and detritus on wall, with artist book documentation)  
Size:  One wall, covering approximately 15 x 20 feet 
Date: 2009 
Location: Kentler International Drawing Space, NYC 
Curated by Susan Schwalb and Margaret Mathews-Berenson

Description: In 2009 I set out to curate a set of short statements on, for lack of a better way to say it, “the artist’s knowledge.” I invited 24 people to contribute, each representing a different axis in my life between the terms artist and academic.  I asked each invited participant to write me a short statement. They were then asked to pick an object, take a picture of it, send it to me with their statement, and describe an action to be done with it.  I performed each action with a video camera strapped to my body.  All traces left behind from the actions were then mapped in silverpoint and a hole made at every point that two lines intersected.  Actions and objects included spitting liquid through a straw at the wall each time I was thirsty, using a blender to blend pomegranate seeds at the top of a ladder, reading to the wall, and making music with a rock. An artist book of the statements and instruction pieces along with video documentation was later produced.  


co/operaTION

Media: performance-based installation (silverpoint, holes, and detritus on wall)  
Size:  One wall, covering approximately 15 x 20 feet 
Date: 2009 
Location: Kentler International Drawing Space, NYC 
Curated by Susan Schwalb and Margaret Mathews-Berenson

Description: In 2009 I set out to curate a set of short statements on, for lack of a better way to say it, “the artist’s knowledge.” I invited 24 people to contribute, each representing a different axis in my life between the terms artist and academic.  I asked each invited participant to write me a short statement. They were then asked to pick an object, take a picture of it, send it to me with their statement, and describe an action to be done with it.  I performed each action with a video camera strapped to my body.  All traces left behind from the actions were then mapped in silverpoint and a hole made at every point that two lines intersected.  Actions and objects included spitting liquid through a straw at the wall each time I was thirsty, using a blender to blend pomegranate seeds at the top of a ladder, reading to the wall, and making music with a rock. An artist book of the statements and instruction pieces along with video documentation was later produced. 


Participatory democracy

Media: performance-based installation (silverpoint, holes, and detritus on wall, with video documentation)  
Size:  One wall, covering approximately 11 x 16 feet 
Date: 2004 
Location: Art Interactive, Boston, MA
Curated by George Fifield

Description: A result of  conversations between me and visitors to Art Interactive during the   Democratic National Convention, 2004. Participants were invited into the gallery space  to have a conversation with me about democracy and the vote.  As a “conversation  starter” they were invited to bring and temporarily place an object that symbolized  democracy, or a related issue.  I invited each participant to use the gallery wall as a pin- up board for their object, which remained installed in the space for the length of our  conversation.  After each conversation, the participant was invited to de-install their  object.  All traces left behind from the action of installing and de-installing, including the outline of binding materials, were then mapped in silverpoint and a hole made at every  point that two lines intersected.  Objects included a rotten orange thrown at the wall, a  cell phone, a golf ball, and the first bullet someone shot. 


working notes

Media: performance-based installation (silverpoint, holes, and detritus on wall, with sound installation and framed documents)  
Size:  Two walls, covering approximately 14 x 40 feet
Date: 2004 
Location: Aidekman Gallery, Medford, MA
MFA Thesis Show

Description: I invited everyone who was part of the 'machine' producing me as a Master of Fine Arts (faculty, students, technicians, groundskeepers) into the gallery space to have a conversation with me about the MFA as a bureaucratic structure and its role in the production of the professional body of the artist.  The post-script to the invitation read: “In case it is important to you: this conversation is a private one.  Its purpose is to offer a space of contextual reflection within the gallery during the installation and exhibition of an MFA thesis show.  I will not be reporting or recording the content of our conversations:  the value of these will lie in whatever we say to each other, how we influence each other and further each others’ thought.” To facilitate conversations, I invited everyone to bring an object representing their perspectives and to temporarily install their objects in the gallery space in whatever way they wanted.  After each conversation, I used silverpoint to map the placement of objects and encode data about each person (role and years in the institution), after which I made a hole at every point that two lines intersected.   Also in the space was a framed email invitation to participate, a blueprint diagraming the parameters of the piece, and a sound element.